Free Printable Planners Are Here: Get Yours!

Free Printable Planners Are Here: Get Yours!

Why do you need free printable planners?

Because everyone plans.

Even those who don’t plan to plan, do. Because if you don’t make a plan to succeed, then you are actually planning to fail. Or at least that’s what some people say. I recently posted about Outlining Your Life Day by Day even before you plan. As for me?

I LOVE planning.

Especially when the planners are fun and FREE! But what you consider fun may not be what someone else considers fun, right? We all have our own ideas of what we like in the way of design. Some like subtle colors or minimal images, while others like bold colors and lots of action in their designs.

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That’s why I made four different sets.

I think the variety of styles in these planners provides something for just about anyone. They are .pdf format and are 8.5 x 11, so you can print them out and punch holes for a notebook. Or slip them in a plastic sleeve and use an erasable marker over and over. Of course, you are welcome to make as many copies as you like.

[download id=”2068″]free printable planner

I’m all for sharing.

So if you have friends who like the free printable planners you download here, please send them the link to this blog so they can get their own copy. There’s really nothing to stop you from just printing copies for them, too, but I’m asking you not to do that. You found these fun free printable planners, so let them have the fun of looking around my blog and finding new goodies, too. (Besides, I want to meet them!)

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Each Free Printable Planner Set has 8 planners.

I’m currently working on a notebook that will have 28 planners, and as soon as it’s done, I’ll let you know. Meanwhile, enjoy these free printable planners. Let me know if you have particular ideas about what should be included in the notebook. Here’s what I’ve planned for it:

  1. 4-quadrant planner
  2. blog content planner
  3. budget planner
  4. daily planner
  5. meals / grocery list planner
  6. monthly calendar
  7. weekly calendar
  8. vacation planner
  9. to do list
  10. weight tracker
  11. books planner
  12. password keeper
  13. habit tracker
  14. goals tracker
  15. Bible / Scripture log
  16. activities schedule
  17. language learner log
  18. macros tracker
  19. vacation packing planner
  20. yearly cleaning schedule
  21. daily routine
  22. homework planner
  23. contacts list
  24. birthdays
  25. exercise goals tracker
  26. when did I last…? tracker
  27. correspondance tracker
  28. what to do in 5 minutes

The first 8 are in each free printable planner set.

 

  • What kind of planners do you use?

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Outlining Your Life Day by Day

Outlining Your Life Day by Day

Does life happen to you, or do you happen to life?

Does it seem as though organizing your life doesn’t get the results you’re looking for? Perhaps you (like I am) are addicted to bullet journaling, or maybe you have a planner that you’ve custom made for organizing your life.

But do your days follow your plan?

Maybe we’ve been looking at it from the wrong angle. Maybe our lives would be better organized if we had a framework from which to launch out into life.
Do you remember your days in school when you had an essay or term paper to write? You started with an outline, the framework upon which you would build your argument or theme.

Is an outline what you need for organizing your life?

I was recently reading a book called The Daniel Dilemma by Chris Hodges. He spoke at my church a few weeks ago and even before he was finished speaking I had gone to Amazon and ordered the book his message was taken from. This morning I came across this little gem in the book: “Whatever we put in first place becomes the organizing principle for the other parts of our lives. Think of it like an outline for those papers you had to write in school. When you focus on your guiding principle, it automatically takes care of many other decisions.”

So what is your guiding principle?

At the beginning of each year, I ask God for a word that can guide me throughout the year. This year the word was serve. So I want to make my guiding principle say something like “In whatever I do, I want to serve God through being His hands and feet in my everyday life.”
Now when I outline my life today, I need to think in terms of what I am doing to serve Him. My old organizational way would be to list all the tasks I had to accomplish today and put them in my bullet journal with little boxes next to them to check off when they are done. There’s a lot of good feelings attached to checking off those boxes! I always feel like I’ve accomplished a lot.

But have those things accomplished the purpose of my day’s “essay”?

This morning, I decided to look at my day’s activities and demands from my “outline perspective.” Who am I serving today? Who is most important and what—in general—do I need to do to serve them? Here’s what my outline looks like:
organizing your life

It’s just an outline

Like an essay, this doesn’t define my whole day. It simply gives it structure. It lays out what is most important and what is less so. If I were writing a book, it would be the chapter headings, not the content of the chapters. In order to bring the book to print, I’d have to fill in all the details and tell the story the chapter headings allude to.
Because my guiding principle is to serve, I have placed checking in on friends before my blog business. You, my readers (and my friends), are important to me, and that’s why the blog business is on the outline. But the business part takes second seat to the people God has placed in my life.
My closest friends and I have a “chat line” on Facebook Messenger. We keep in touch with each other daily, sharing thoughts, prayer requests, and plans. Even if I don’t pick up the phone and call each one, they know I am thinking of them and praying for their day. It takes only a few minutes every day, but it’s vitally important to check in with each other. We care about each other and the things that touch our lives, so we share.
Here’s what my daily for today looks like in my bullet journal. (See how to use a bullet journal here.)
organizing your life
The tasks on my daily page are not written in any particular order, just as I thought of them. Using my guiding principle, serve, will help me prioritize them. My outline helps me do that.
So, what do you think?

Will you use an outline to organize your life by your guiding principle?

Scheduling to Lessen Stress in a Too-Busy World

Scheduling to Lessen Stress in a Too-Busy World

Your Free Q4 Planner

Your Free Daily Planner

We live in a stress-filled, too busy world, and scheduling is just one more thing to do.

“You already have too many things to do.”

If you’re anything like I am, you already have too many things to do and not enough time in which to do them. From getting everyone out the door in the morning to finding time to spend with God, you’re busier now than you’ve ever been. You’ve probably seen all the time management and scheduling tips and tricks you can find on Pinterest and even tried them for awhile, but somehow, you always end up behind again. That sound familiar?
Me, too! Well, take heart. I’m going to show you how to decide what to put on that to-do list, and then show you a way to get things done without losing your sanity. It’s a three-step process, and one which will make your day much less stressful.

The first thing you need is a list of all your to-dos.

A complete list. Write down absolutely everything you have to do or want to do, in one long list. Don’t prioritize or try to decide what to put on and what to leave off. Just list everything you can think of.

Now take a piece of paper and divide it into fourths (fold it in half one way and then in half the other way). Now we’re going to label the quadrants as follows: Q1: Important/Urgent; Q2 Important/Not Urgent; Q3 Not Important/Urgent; and Q4 Not Important/Not Urgent. You’re going to put each item on your list in one of those squares, but there’s a secret to doing it the right way. Let’s look at definitions. Important means there is a negative consequence for not doing it. Urgent means there’s a negative consequence for not doing it NOW. At first, you’ll find a lot of stuff listed in Q1, but over time, you’ll be working mostly from Q2 and sometimes from Q3, but rarely from Q4.

Deciding on where things go.

Now that you have a list of things you need to get done, the real work begins.

It’s not really difficult, but you do need to sort your list, putting each thing in its appropriate quadrant.

But how do you know what goes where?

If you can’t decide where something goes in your scheduling, ask yourself the following questions:

 

“What will happen if I don’t do it at all? What will happen if I don’t do it now?”

Answering those two questions will help you see clearly where each item should go. Q1 is for things that absolutely must be done right away. You’re going to work at staying out of that quadrant! Q2 is for important matters that aren’t (yet) urgent. The trick will be to schedule time for those things so they don’t ever make it into Q1. This is the quadrant where you want most of your items to reside. Q3 is for things like buying something you’d like to have that’s on sale NOW, but won’t have a negative consequence if you don’t buy it. Q4 is for things you’d like to get around to, but it’s okay if they don’t actually get done. Nothing earth-shattering will happen if you just let them go.

The time-block method of scheduling.

After you have assigned all your to-do items to one of the quadrants, you’re going to use the time block method to tackle the list and see it shrink. Here’s how the time block system works.

“15 minute blocks of time will take care of most tasks.”

Block out fifteen minutes on your calendar or in your planner to tackle one of the scheduling items in Q1. Work at it steadily for fifteen minutes and then quit. If you find it takes more time than that, you can always block in another fifteen minutes to get it done, but chances are fifteen minutes will take care of the worst of the problem. Create fifteen minute blocks of time and work through your list, giving most of your attention to Q1 tasks.

Don’t ignore Q2

For every two Q1 tasks you complete, do a Q2 task, too. If you ignore Q2, first thing you know you’ll have all those tasks in Q1, too!

Naturally, appointments eventually end up in Q1 and must be attended to when they are due. But put bills to pay in Q2 unless they are overdue, and then pay them before they absolutely have to move into Q1. The trick is to gradually get rid of Q1 tasks and then keep them at a minimum. Q2 tasks should take the majority of your time and attention.
I’ve prepared two printables, one Quadrant Page and one Daily Page. Use these to help you implement this system, and before you know it, you’ll have everything under control. Just click on the image to download.

What do you do to organize your time and tasks? Share in the comments.